Last edited by Voodoogul
Wednesday, February 5, 2020 | History

1 edition of Throne of Adulis found in the catalog.

Throne of Adulis

G. W. Bowersock

Throne of Adulis

Red Sea wars on the eve of Islam

by G. W. Bowersock

  • 351 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Judaism,
  • Jews,
  • History,
  • Christianity and other religions,
  • Relations,
  • Christianity

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementG.W. Bowersock
    SeriesEmblems of antiquity, Emblems of antiquity
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDS231 .B69 2013
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25361778M
    ISBN 109780199739325
    LC Control Number2012023593

    This in turn prompted Kobishchanov to later argue that Adulis had been destroyed by an Arab raid in the mid-7th century, a view that has since been partially rejected. Bowersock offers a narrative account of this fascinating but overlooked chapter in pre-Islamic Arabian history. The Throne of Adulis book of the war, Bowersock tells us, occurred when Yusuf, the Jewish king of Himyar, massacred hundreds of Christians living in Najran. Third, the Christian merchant erroneously believed that the throne and its accompanying stele contained a single Greek text. There seems to be an underlying subconscious strain of moral judgement there — not something one can easily put a finger on, but the choice of adjectives and adverbs strikes me very uneven at times. In the midst of this conflict, a new religion was born, destined to bring a wholly unanticipated resolution to the power struggle in Arabia.

    Archeological excavations[ edit ] Adulis was one of the first Axumite sites to undergo excavation, when a French mission to Eritrea under Vignaud and Petit performed an initial survey inand prepared a map which marked the location of three structures they believed were temples. This in turn prompted Kobishchanov Throne of Adulis book later argue that Adulis had been destroyed by an Arab raid in the mid-7th century, a view that has since been partially rejected. But when the victorious Kaleb--said to have retired to a monastery-left behind weak leaders in both Ethiopia and Himyar, the Byzantine and Persian empires expanded their activity in the Arabian territory. In the midst of this conflict, a new religion was born, destined to bring a wholly unanticipated resolution to the power struggle in Arabia. This brief book offers a lively introduction to the early history of Ethiopia and its relations with South Arabia. It may have previously been known as Berenice Panchrysos of the Ptolemies.

    Shoemaker G. Menas between two kneeling camels. Agrandir Original jpeg, 16k 1Between and CE, a Christian merchant traveled to Adulis, a port city on the Red Sea coast of Africa, and recorded the Greek texts inscribed on a white marble throne and a black basalt stele for the king negus of Ethiopian Aksum. Bowersock carefully reconstructs this fascinating but overlooked chapter in pre-Islamic Arabian history.


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Throne of Adulis by G. W. Bowersock Download PDF Ebook

This brief book offers a lively introduction to the early history of Ethiopia and its relations with South Arabia. Trying to decipher and understand this monument takes us directly into religious conflicts that occupied the nations on both sides of the Red Sea in late antiquity.

The imperial pretensions of the Adulis Throne, raised centuries earlier, had come Throne of Adulis book fruition, but now in the name of a Christian victory over Judaism.

Moreover, his criticisms of proposals by Hawting With a title like The Throne of Throne of Adulis book and a subtitle of the Eve of Islam, one expects a contextualised discussion of kingship around the Red Sea within a relatively short timeframe.

Moreover, it synthesizes and pinpoints in a readable fashion the significance of recent scholarly advances in Aksumite and south Arabian epigraphy, archaeology, and history, including those of Christian Julien Robin and his fellow travelers. In the midst of this conflict, a new religion was born, destined to bring a wholly unanticipated resolution to the power struggle in Arabia.

Most of these chronicles puts Adulis smack-dab at the middle of the Axumite kingdom and subsumes it as an integral part of this very kingdom. Though little known today, this was an Our knowledge of this ancient structure comes entirely from the famous sixth-century traveler and geographer, Cosmas Indicopleustes, who saw the monument in the city of Adulis on the coast of the Red Sea sometime around c.

The anonymous text describes the King's conquests in the Agame a region in TigrayEthiopia. Cosmas had been tasked with making a transcription of these Greek inscriptions for the Ethiopian king in Axum, and apparently he kept a copy for himself, which he then included in his Christian Topography.

Menas between two kneeling camels.

Monumentum Adulitanum

Our knowledge of these events derives largely from an inscribed marble throne at the Ethiopian port of Adulis, meticulously described by a sixth-century Christian merchant known as Cosmas Indicopleustes.

Just prior to the rise of Islam Throne of Adulis book the sixth century AD, southern Arabia was embroiled in a violent conflict between Christian Ethiopians and Jewish Arabs.

Compare all 2 sellers About This Item We aim to show you accurate product information. This port was the principal staging area for Kaleb 's invasion of the Himyarite kingdom of Dhu Nuwas around First, the Adulis Throne is consistent with roughly several dozen thrones that Aksumite kings raised subsequently at Aksum or other sites In the midst of this conflict, a new religion was born, destined to bring a wholly unanticipated resolution to the power struggle in Arabia.

Moreover, the nature of the object itself, with inscriptions from two different periods and its description during Throne of Adulis book third period, enables it to serve as an Throne of Adulis book of ancient Ethiopia in three distinct periods: the Hellenistic period, the early Roman Empire, and late antiquity.

See our disclaimer Just prior to the rise of Islam in the sixth century AD, southern Arabia was embroiled in a violent conflict between Christian Ethiopians and Jewish Arabs. He misunderstood the name of the place, thinking the toponym meant that it had been founded by escaped Egyptian slaves.Glen Bowersock's study of the throne of Adulis fulfils this remit admirably.

The subject matter of the book is summarized succinctly in the `Book Description' given above (taken from the dust-jacket). It is a fascinating micro-history of a little known period in ancient history, and readers should not expect more/5(20).

Get this from a library! Throne of Adulis: Red Sea wars on the eve of Islam. [G W Bowersock] -- "Just prior to the rise of Islam in the sixth century AD, southern Arabia was embroiled in a violent conflict between Christian Ethiopians and Jewish Arabs.

Though little known today, this was an. Jan 01,  · The Throne of Adulis centres around the eponymous, now lost, artefact: a white marble throne and accompanying black basalt stele which stood in an African port city during the sixth century.

Transcriptions made of the throne's inscriptions during the sixth century allow G.W. Bowersock to reconstruct something of the history of the regions bordering the Red Sea during the Hellenistic period /5.Jun 25,  · The Adulis throne and its inscription apparently dated from pdf late second or early third century pdf and described the conquests of an Axumite Negus or king on both sides of the Red Sea, westwards from Axum towards the upper Nilotic lands, Nubia and the kingdom of Meroë, and across the Sea into the Ḥimyarite lands of Yemen and western Author: C.

Edmund Bosworth.Jul 25,  · The Throne of Adulis vividly recreates the Red Sea world of Late Antiquity, transporting readers back to a remote but pivotal epoch in ancient history, one that sheds light on the collapse of the Persian Empire as well as the rise of Islam.

Preview this book.May 29,  · Buy The Throne of Adulis: Ebook Sea Wars on the Eve of Islam (Emblems of Antiquity) 1st Edition by G.W.

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Bowersock (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(12).